Artists Talk with John Hitchcock and Pamela J. Peters | Visit Stockton

Artists Talk with John Hitchcock and Pamela J. Peters

Admission: Free & Open to the Public

Location: LH Horton Jr. Gallery, San Joaquin Delta College

5151 Pacific Ave.
Stockton, CA 95207

Time: 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

Contact: Jan Marlese
Email: jan.marlese@deltacollege.edu
Phone: (209) 954-5507

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Mapped location of Artists Talk with John Hitchcock and Pamela J. Peters

Artists Talk with John Hitchcock and Pamela J. Peters

Join us for a virtual artist talk in conjunction with the Horton Gallery's live exhibition of works by multi-media artist John Hitchcock, "Bury the Hatchet: A Prayer for My P’ah-Be", and Pamela J. Peters photography series and film, "Legacy of Exiled NDNZ."

Virtual Artist Talk: September 30 - 5:30pm

Gallery Exhibition: September 23 – October 27

Gallery Hours: Tue- Wed-Thur 11am-2pm

Bury the Hatchet: A Prayer for My P’ah-Be is artist John Hitchcock’s mixed-media, cross-disciplinary, multisensory installation. Hitchcock combines his interests in printmaking, Rock ‘n’ Roll, and Kiowa and Comanche history into one visual expression that offers a re-telling of the narrative of the American Frontier. Working from the theme of the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, Bury the Hatchet explores issues of assimilation, acculturation, and indoctrination through oral history and music. Bury the Hatchet develops a shared language to interrogate historic and modern institutions to prompt a re-definition and re-imagining of our present reality.

Pamela J. Peters photography series and short film, Legacy of Exiled NDNZ, examines American Indians living in urban America, in this case, Los Angeles, California. Her project focuses on young adults (from various tribes: Navajo, Cherokee, Seminole, Barona Bands of Mission Indians and Lakota) who have migrated from their reservations in the course of their own lives or are the offspring of families that relocated from various tribal reservations through the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ (BIA) Relocation program, which took place during the late 1950s through the 1960s. This photo/film project showcase young adults of today paying “tribute” to the first generation of Relocated (exiled) Indians.